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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i rise today to bring attention a critically important piece of legislation that the senate has passed and that the house needs to pass immediately. it passed the senate with bipartisan support. there are those on both sides of the aisle in the house of representatives that support passing it and i'm here to urge in the strongest terms possible that the speaker bring this bill up before the house and get it passed. now, many people, because of my speaking in the past, may be i'm referring to the farm bill, which i also believe we need to have the house take up and pass, because of our bipartisan work, but i actually after referring today to the fact that we have only 27 days until we go over the fiscal cliff, or for middle-class families, what this means is 27 days before their taxes go up on average $2,200. so what we're talking about is the fact that we passed a bil bill -- we didn't just pass a bill. we passed a bill in july, july 25 of this year, the sen
dingell, democrat from michigan and he has been serving since 1955. previouslpreviousl y his father sanded -- served in the same congressional district until his father died in the sun ran and took his place. dingell is, used to be thought of as illiberal and no one thinks of him as a liberal and certainly the democrats don't because they marginalize him. and yet thank you has proven and i show it throughout the book that even with the democrats in the minority and even with him being removed from the pecking order power, they want to get things done. this why the guy knows how to pull strings on behalf of the district to get parts appropriated to get bills passed and he passed his pipeline safety bill which is essentially a regulation bill during the tea party congress. it's almost unheard of, but dingell is i think a dying breed. his philosophy is, you govern from the center. you begin writing a bill from the center which means you bring everybody on board, put them in a room and talk about what they like. it's not the way it works in today zero some policy where their idea now the rep
counterweight hezekiah spent a lot of time with, john dingell, democrat from michigan has been serving since 1955 and previous to him, his father served in the same congressional district until his father died and his son ran and took his place. dingell used to be thought of as liberal. no to think of him as a liberal now. democrats don't because they marginalize him. they didn't find him liberal to keep them on as chairman of the all powerful commerce committee. i show it to you that even with democrats than it can already, even being removed from the pecking order of power is able to get things done. this one-of-a-kind us how to pull strings on behalf of this district and get parts appropriated, to get bills passed. he passed his pipeline safety bill come essentially regulation bill during the tea party congress almost unheard of. but t-tango is a think a dying breed. his philosophy is to govern from the center. he began writing a bill, which means to bring everybody on board and get them in a room and talk about what they would like. it's not the way of works in today's zero-sum politics
? >> guest: that's a complicated question, and i can speak from my own experience. i live in michigan where i'm not permitted to marry, and, in fact, we are constitutionally prohibited to have heritage or similar yiewn your -- union purpose, the terrible language of our constitution. mark and i talked about getting married, say, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when
: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. i want to take just a moment to thank our distinguished colleague and my dear friend for his wonderful service. we serve on the one hand three committees together. it's been my honor to serve on the committee that senator conrad chairs, the budget committee, and to have him serve as a senior member of the agriculture committee, which i chair, and to have both of us sit on the finance committee together. today he has done what he has always done for us, which is to provide vision, common sense, intelligence, and a lot of numbers. and they add up, and they make sense, and so in listening to senator conrad's farewell speech, i want to thank him again for giving us a path forward. this is someone who will forever be in the senate history record as one of the great statesmen of our country, someone with intelligence, respect on both sides, compassion, a fighter from north dakota like i've never seen, and someone who serves in the best tradition of what it means to be an honorable public servant. and so he's been a role model for m
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6